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Silence is Deafening

I often get accused of being silent.  In another dimension, my New Look team accused me of being manipulative with my silence – especially when they came to me with a problem to solve.  What they didn’t really get was that I am a reflective thinker.  And therefore, need some time to assimilate the information that was given to me, before either asking for further clarification or determining a course of action.

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However uncomfortable that pause for thought was for them, it was very important to me.  Over the years the team came to recognise that there is more than one option for action.  Even when they had identified two there was, quite often, a third that had not yet been considered.  More often than not, this was a middle ground that offered a solution for all parties and had a positive, financial impact on the business!

I have also been told that I think (consider) too much.  This maybe so.  I very rarely take immediate action on a gut feeling.  Indeed I am not entirely sure that I know what that feels like. Ooooh am I reflecting on that piece of information?

Last year, I chose to study and explore my happiness.   This year, I am working on recognising limbic feelings and emotions.  It could be quite an interesting journey.  Whilst I spend much time thinking laterally about the future, I worry little about what has been.  It begs the question that having weighed up all the pros and cons of a course of action means that that the fall out of said options have been well considered and weighted in favour of a positive outcome.  Therefore perhaps indeed, Silence is Golden 

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2 Comments »

  1. Gut feelings are highly significant, Lauara. Although, as you know, you have 100 billion neurons in your brain, you do also have a second ‘brain’ in your gut which has 500 million neurons. Most of the serotnin in your body alsoemanates from these neurons rather than from the brain. The significance is massive. Here’s just one thing to consider… once you get past 7 variables, making decisions based on gut response (intuition) leads to higher subsequent levels of satisfaction with the decision, even years later. Conscious analytical thought only really works for very simple problems. Check out Hare Barin, Tortoise Mind by Guy Claxton. Don’t believe me? Read up on how Einstein discovered his theory of relativity.

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